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Paremiologic survey of some Persian and Danish proverbs

AUTHOR Abedian Kasgari, Ali Akbar
PUBLISHER Independently Published (06/29/2019)
PRODUCT TYPE Paperback (Paperback)

Description
Language is a social institution and its most important task is to create links between the communities. Language has long been considered by human as the oldest social phenomenon. Since some centuries B. C., when Panini formulated some rules for Sanskrit language, the complex nature of language became the focus of attention of scholars. This kind of approach gradually led to the emergence of linguistics. Linguistics is a science that systematically examines language as an independent phenomenon. Linguists consider language as the easiest way to convey mental concepts and believe language is the simplest tool that one can use to communicate with others. Sometimes language is referred to as the key of the communication networks, and sometimes as means by which individuals can master it. For the thorough study of language, the intrinsic complexity of language led linguistics to study the descriptive and theoretical aspects of some other disciplines. One of the results of this evolution is the creation of an interdisciplinary domain called Applied Linguistics and a subfield called Paremiology which explores the proverbs. Proverbs are found in all languages, they are considered as part of folklore and social literature. Although proverbs may vary in terms of subjects and functions, it is generally accepted that the majority of the proverbs have adhered to certain social formations. Besides, regardless of the belonging languages, certain syntactic structures are based on the infrastructure of the proverbs. Paremiological surveys show that typical traditional examples about the proverbs are: X is Y; No X, no Y; Where there is X, there is Y; and Better X than Y. These syntactic structures or proverbial formulae which are in two fundamental affirmative and negative forms are found in Persian and Danish proverbs as well and are used together with other syntactic markers, phonological markers, and semantic markers as key parts of the proverbs. Hence, discussing and studying these proverbs can make us familiar with common cultural aspects of the Persian and Danish societies; it specifies the value and norms of the societies as well. In this Book, some Persian and Danish affirmative and negative proverbs are investigated based on equivalent components. The result shows that Persian and Danish proverbs have spoken of two common categories of values and norms, and anti-values and abnormalities. First, some equivalent positive values and norms such as encouraging to truthfulness, effort, patience and tolerance, pragmatic, wise, etc; are surveyed. And in the second term, some equivalent anti-values and abnormal proverbs which have been blamed such as lying, avarice, cruelty, etc; are studied.This Book will provide a brief overview of the homogenous proverbs in Persian and Danish and description of the usages of some homogenous proverbs in both languages. Persian is the predominant modern descendant of Old Persian and is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. With a long history of literature, Persian was the first language in the Muslim world to break through Arabic's monopoly on writing, and the writing of poetry in Persian was established as a court tradition in many eastern courts. Persian has had a considerable (mainly lexical) influence on neighboring languages, particularly the Turkic languages in Central Asia, Caucasus, and Anatolia, neighboring Iranian languages, as well as Armenian, Georgian, and Indo-Aryan languages. For centuries, Persian has been a prestigious cultural language in other regions of Western Asia, Central Asia, and South Asia by the various empires based in the regions. Following the Turko-Persian Ghaznavid conquest of South Asia, Persian was firstly introduced in the region by Turkic Central Asians. One of the major effects of the Persian language on the neighboring languages is the influx of the Persian proverbs in their contexts, some of the
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ISBN-13: 9781077091467
ISBN-10: 107709146X
Binding: Paperback or Softback (Trade Paperback (Us))
Content Language: English
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Page Count: 144
Carton Quantity: 50
Product Dimensions: 6.00 x 0.34 x 9.00 inches
Weight: 0.49 pound(s)
Country of Origin: US
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Language is a social institution and its most important task is to create links between the communities. Language has long been considered by human as the oldest social phenomenon. Since some centuries B. C., when Panini formulated some rules for Sanskrit language, the complex nature of language became the focus of attention of scholars. This kind of approach gradually led to the emergence of linguistics. Linguistics is a science that systematically examines language as an independent phenomenon. Linguists consider language as the easiest way to convey mental concepts and believe language is the simplest tool that one can use to communicate with others. Sometimes language is referred to as the key of the communication networks, and sometimes as means by which individuals can master it. For the thorough study of language, the intrinsic complexity of language led linguistics to study the descriptive and theoretical aspects of some other disciplines. One of the results of this evolution is the creation of an interdisciplinary domain called Applied Linguistics and a subfield called Paremiology which explores the proverbs. Proverbs are found in all languages, they are considered as part of folklore and social literature. Although proverbs may vary in terms of subjects and functions, it is generally accepted that the majority of the proverbs have adhered to certain social formations. Besides, regardless of the belonging languages, certain syntactic structures are based on the infrastructure of the proverbs. Paremiological surveys show that typical traditional examples about the proverbs are: X is Y; No X, no Y; Where there is X, there is Y; and Better X than Y. These syntactic structures or proverbial formulae which are in two fundamental affirmative and negative forms are found in Persian and Danish proverbs as well and are used together with other syntactic markers, phonological markers, and semantic markers as key parts of the proverbs. Hence, discussing and studying these proverbs can make us familiar with common cultural aspects of the Persian and Danish societies; it specifies the value and norms of the societies as well. In this Book, some Persian and Danish affirmative and negative proverbs are investigated based on equivalent components. The result shows that Persian and Danish proverbs have spoken of two common categories of values and norms, and anti-values and abnormalities. First, some equivalent positive values and norms such as encouraging to truthfulness, effort, patience and tolerance, pragmatic, wise, etc; are surveyed. And in the second term, some equivalent anti-values and abnormal proverbs which have been blamed such as lying, avarice, cruelty, etc; are studied.This Book will provide a brief overview of the homogenous proverbs in Persian and Danish and description of the usages of some homogenous proverbs in both languages. Persian is the predominant modern descendant of Old Persian and is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. With a long history of literature, Persian was the first language in the Muslim world to break through Arabic's monopoly on writing, and the writing of poetry in Persian was established as a court tradition in many eastern courts. Persian has had a considerable (mainly lexical) influence on neighboring languages, particularly the Turkic languages in Central Asia, Caucasus, and Anatolia, neighboring Iranian languages, as well as Armenian, Georgian, and Indo-Aryan languages. For centuries, Persian has been a prestigious cultural language in other regions of Western Asia, Central Asia, and South Asia by the various empires based in the regions. Following the Turko-Persian Ghaznavid conquest of South Asia, Persian was firstly introduced in the region by Turkic Central Asians. One of the major effects of the Persian language on the neighboring languages is the influx of the Persian proverbs in their contexts, some of the
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