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The Origins of Backwardness in Eastern Europe: Economics and Politics from the Middle Ages Until the Early Twentieth Century

PUBLISHER University of California Press (08/12/1991)
PRODUCT TYPE Paperback (Paperback)

Description
Reaching back centuries, this study makes a convincing case for very deep roots of current Eastern European backwardness. Its conclusions are suggestive for comparativists studying other parts of the world, and useful to those who want to understand contemporary Eastern Europe's past. Like the rest of the world except for that unique part of the West which has given us a false model of what was normal, Eastern Europe developed slowly. The weight of established class relations, geography, lack of technological innovation, and wars kept the area from growing richer.

In the nineteenth century the West exerted a powerful influence, but it was political more than economic. Nationalism and the creation of newly independent aspiring nation-states then began to shape national economies, often in unfavorable ways.

One of this book's most important lessons is that while economics may limit the freedom of action of political players, it does not determine political outcomes. The authors offer no simple explanations but rather a theoretically complex synthesis that demonstrates the interaction of politics and economics.
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Product Format
Product Details
ISBN-13: 9780520076402
ISBN-10: 0520076400
Binding: Paperback or Softback (Trade Paperback (Us))
Content Language: English
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Page Count: 269
Carton Quantity: 26
Product Dimensions: 5.99 x 0.70 x 8.95 inches
Weight: 0.82 pound(s)
Country of Origin: US
Subject Information
BISAC Categories
Business & Economics | Eastern Europe - General
Business & Economics | Europe - General
Dewey Decimal: 330.947
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
publisher marketing
Reaching back centuries, this study makes a convincing case for very deep roots of current Eastern European backwardness. Its conclusions are suggestive for comparativists studying other parts of the world, and useful to those who want to understand contemporary Eastern Europe's past. Like the rest of the world except for that unique part of the West which has given us a false model of what was normal, Eastern Europe developed slowly. The weight of established class relations, geography, lack of technological innovation, and wars kept the area from growing richer.

In the nineteenth century the West exerted a powerful influence, but it was political more than economic. Nationalism and the creation of newly independent aspiring nation-states then began to shape national economies, often in unfavorable ways.

One of this book's most important lessons is that while economics may limit the freedom of action of political players, it does not determine political outcomes. The authors offer no simple explanations but rather a theoretically complex synthesis that demonstrates the interaction of politics and economics.
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Editor: Chirot, Daniel
Daniel Chirot is the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor of International Studies and of Sociology at the University of Washington in Seattle. His most recent book is called "Contested Identities: Ethnic, Religious, and" "Nationalist Conflicts in Today s World "and was recently published by Routledge. He is the author of "Modern Tyrants", published by Princeton University Press, and the co-author, with Clark McCauley, of "Why Not" "Kill Them All? The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder", also published by Princeton. He has written several books about global social change and has authored as well as edited other books about economic history, ethnic conflict, and international politics. Chirot has served as a consultant for various foundations and NGOS working in Eastern Europe and West Africa. His research and writing has been helped by grants from, among others, the United States Institute of Peace, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He has a BA from Harvard University in Social Studies and a PhD in Sociology from Columbia University.
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