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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave (Classic Reprint)

AUTHOR Douglass, Frederick
PUBLISHER Forgotten Books (04/18/2018)
PRODUCT TYPE Paperback (Paperback)

Description
Frederick Bailey was born in circumstances that could scarcely have been more humble. A slave in Maryland in 1818, he was born amongst whispers that he could be the Master's son. He was, because of the gruelling work schedule of the farm, growing up without a clear memory of even his mother's face in the daylight.

He was passed around from family to family and Master to Mistress. A bewildering and no doubt distressing roller coaster of faces and expectations which began when he was only seven. The young Douglass on the edge of adulthood reached out for new worlds, he learned to read, he reached out and taught others and in so doing found himself in the hands of a particularly cruel master.

His quest for escape and freedom did not run smoothly, but he was fuelled by love and hope in form of Anna Murray, a free black woman. She helped him to take the terrifying step of leaping aboard a train headed for the free states, dressed as a sailor, carrying the papers of a free colored Seaman. After 20 years enslaved, the journey to freedom took less than a day.

Hot on his heels was Anna Murray, and after they were married, in casting around for a suitable married name Frederick Douglass and Anna Murray-Douglass were born. As a social reformer, an abolitionist and the only African American to attend Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Seneca Falls convention, Frederick Douglass was singular. His words are moving, inspiring and enthralling by turns.

Only in the 'Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass' can we see through his eyes and know how he felt on the eve of every momentous step.

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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Product Format
Product Details
ISBN-13: 9781331835219
ISBN-10: 1331835216
Binding: Paperback or Softback (Trade Paperback (Us))
Content Language: English
More Product Details
Page Count: 146
Carton Quantity: 54
Product Dimensions: 5.98 x 0.31 x 9.02 inches
Weight: 0.45 pound(s)
Country of Origin: US
Subject Information
BISAC Categories
Literary Criticism | Cultural, Ethnic & Regional - General
Literary Criticism | Ethnic Studies - African American Studies
Literary Criticism | Historical
Grade Level: 6th Grade and up
Accelerated Reader:
Reading Level: 0
Point Value: 0
Guided Reading Level: Not Applicable
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
publisher marketing
Frederick Bailey was born in circumstances that could scarcely have been more humble. A slave in Maryland in 1818, he was born amongst whispers that he could be the Master's son. He was, because of the gruelling work schedule of the farm, growing up without a clear memory of even his mother's face in the daylight.

He was passed around from family to family and Master to Mistress. A bewildering and no doubt distressing roller coaster of faces and expectations which began when he was only seven. The young Douglass on the edge of adulthood reached out for new worlds, he learned to read, he reached out and taught others and in so doing found himself in the hands of a particularly cruel master.

His quest for escape and freedom did not run smoothly, but he was fuelled by love and hope in form of Anna Murray, a free black woman. She helped him to take the terrifying step of leaping aboard a train headed for the free states, dressed as a sailor, carrying the papers of a free colored Seaman. After 20 years enslaved, the journey to freedom took less than a day.

Hot on his heels was Anna Murray, and after they were married, in casting around for a suitable married name Frederick Douglass and Anna Murray-Douglass were born. As a social reformer, an abolitionist and the only African American to attend Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Seneca Falls convention, Frederick Douglass was singular. His words are moving, inspiring and enthralling by turns.

Only in the 'Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass' can we see through his eyes and know how he felt on the eve of every momentous step.

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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Author: Douglass, Frederick
Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey (Frederick Douglass) was born a slave in Talbot County, Maryland. He took the name Douglass after escaping from the South in 1838.

As a leader in the abolitionist movement, Douglass was famed for his eloquent yet incisive political writing. And, like his near-contemporary, Booker T. Washington, understood the central importance of education in improving the lives of African Americans, and was therefore an early proponent of desegregation.

A firm believer in equal rights for all, Douglass attended a meeting of the National Council of Women in Washington, D.C., in the hours before his death in February 1895.

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