Back to Search

Comic Strip Conversations

AUTHOR Gray, Carol
PUBLISHER Future Horizons (06/01/1994)
PRODUCT TYPE Paperback (Paperback)

Description

Carol Gray combines stick-figures with "conversation symbols" to illustrate what people say and think during conversations. Showing what people are thinking reinforces that others have independent thoughts--a concept that spectrum children don't intuitively understand. Children can also recognize that, although people say one thing, they may think something quite different--another concept foreign to "concrete-thinking" children. Children can draw their own "comic strips" to show what they are thinking and feeling about events or people. Different colors can represent different states of mind. These deceptively simple comic strips can reveal as well as convey quite a lot of substantive information.

The author delves into topics such as:

  • What is a Comic Strip Conversation?
  • The Comic Strip Symbols Dictionary
  • Drawing "small talk"
  • Drawing about a given situation
  • Drawing about an upcoming situation
  • Feelings and COLOR

    Show More
    Product Format
    Product Details
    ISBN-13: 9781885477224
    ISBN-10: 1885477228
    Binding: Paperback or Softback (Trade Paperback (Us))
    Content Language: English
    More Product Details
    Page Count: 39
    Carton Quantity: 88
    Product Dimensions: 8.10 x 0.20 x 10.70 inches
    Weight: 0.35 pound(s)
    Feature Codes: Bibliography, Price on Product, Illustrated
    Country of Origin: US
    Subject Information
    BISAC Categories
    Medical | Pediatrics
    Medical | Communication Studies
    Dewey Decimal: 618.92
    Library of Congress Control Number: 2011389405
    Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
    publisher marketing

    Carol Gray combines stick-figures with "conversation symbols" to illustrate what people say and think during conversations. Showing what people are thinking reinforces that others have independent thoughts--a concept that spectrum children don't intuitively understand. Children can also recognize that, although people say one thing, they may think something quite different--another concept foreign to "concrete-thinking" children. Children can draw their own "comic strips" to show what they are thinking and feeling about events or people. Different colors can represent different states of mind. These deceptively simple comic strips can reveal as well as convey quite a lot of substantive information.

    The author delves into topics such as:

  • What is a Comic Strip Conversation?
  • The Comic Strip Symbols Dictionary
  • Drawing "small talk"
  • Drawing about a given situation
  • Drawing about an upcoming situation
  • Feelings and COLOR

    Show More
    List Price $9.95
    Your Price  $6.87
    Paperback